the time keeper by Mitch Albom……

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If you are familiar with Tuesdays with Morrie and The Five People You Meet in Heaven, then you already have a sense of the time keeper by Mitch Albom.

by Mitch Albom

by Mitch Albom

I thoroughly enjoyed both of those books, so I was excited to learn about the time keeper. At first, I was a little hesitant to buy in to the whole concept because the book is about understanding time. That is a huge undertaking. It shouldn’t have surprised me for one second that Mitch Albom would be able to pull it off.

In the beginning of the story, we meet the man who will become Father Time – the inventor of the concept of measuring periods of light and darkness. God wants him to understand what he has done and how the world will change because of it – perhaps why time was never meant to be measured in minutes and seconds or even full days and months.

Father Time is asked to think about his creation in isolation for what seems to be an eternity. Then, when he is released, he is tasked with finding two people who are intimately aware of time – one who wants more time and one who wants less.

As the story unfolds we learn about the journey the three embark on separately until their worlds meld and they face the “end of their own time” together.

In true Mitch Albom style, it is a beautiful tale told in fable-like fashion where truth and understanding are the most valuable lessons. We learn why time matters and why it shouldn’t. And we are reminded that our own actions are never performed in a bubble – there is always an impact on someone else.

I highly recommend this book. It can be purchased via Amazon here for $16.49.

how to stop time by anne marlowe….

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I think I have shared that I am writing a novel called The Alligator Purse. In my story, the main character Savannah is addicted to heroin.¬†Someone suggested to me that Savannah isn’t believable as a heroin user. To help fix that, they also suggested I read this memoir – how to stop time, heroin from A to Z by ann marlowe.¬†¬†

My exposure to drugs has (thankfully) been very limited. I know nothing about heroin. (Which was apparently abundantly clear.)

If you are a writer, you will probably enjoy this book from a technical level. It is written like a dictionary – broken down into sub-topics which are discussed alphabetically (but with references to other subtopics that apply). I haven’t read a book in this format before and I enjoyed its snippet-style of story telling. Heroin addiction is a heavy topic and it was nice to read about it in small doses (no pun intended).

If you know someone struggling with heroin, this book would give you a lot of insights into what they are facing. It was fascinating to me to read about Ann’s addiction. And to learn that she was highly functional in her professional life.

Apparently some critics have argued that her story doesn’t sound authentic enough – whatever that means. According to her own words, Ann scheduled her life around her drug use. That sounds like at least a heavy dependence to me.

The only reason I mention the critics is to also mention that Ann never claims to know what all addicts go through – this is her story and her story alone. This isn’t a “here’s what happens to anyone who is addicted to heroin” story but rather a “here’s what happened to me” story.

Ann is a professional writer and her story is well written. I was shocked and sad and even laughed a little. This is a terrific book. I am very glad I read it!